the traditionalist

I’m very guilty of surrounding myself with technology. I have a host of devices from a “fruit” inspired company that are designed to make my life easier and more efficient. From said devices, I can access just about anything I might need and of course, I’m writing this post on one of those said devices. I was reading another blog post recently that discussed the daily routines of famous writers, one of the ones that struck me was Simone de Beauvoir (who, it also mentioned, would daily dine with Sartre, oh to run in those circles) and he talked about how he always kept his papers with him and loved the act of writing. I’ve recently started to make a return to using paper. I’ve always loved the feel of notebooks, pens; the romance and anticipation of crafting letters (and the bemusement I get when the recipients call me to ask for a translation because they can’t read my writing). While my said devices can also plan out an infinite number of events, I’ve made the switch back to a paper day planner to complement my notebooks. While a FAUX!-leather planner may seem very corporate, it’s helped make this return to my embrace of certain literary traditions.  I also use a moleskine large reporters notebook for a journal and a volant for miscellaneous notes that I take when reading or working on projects of which I usually have several at any given time. Technology is wonderful, it’s connected me with my family and friends 1200 miles away and has allowed long waits in waiting rooms or grocery store lines to pass by much faster, but it’s also such a hinderance to our progress. As long as I have my faculties, I’ll write. I love the solitude of it. And as long as I’m writing, I’ll always incorporate paper.